SPLM initiates practices for the National Anthem

| Print |

Organizers: We want as many South Sudanese as possible to know the anthem by the time it is sang for the first time in an independent South Sudan

 

JUBA (09 Apr) - In a move to prepare the populace for the imminent declaration of independence of the new Republic of South Sudan, the Sudan Peoples’ Liberation Movement (SPLM) has initiated a series of practices teaching the lyrics and tune of the national anthem.

On Saturday, over 200 people turned up at the SPLM General Secretariat Headquarters in Juba, the capital of South Sudan for the practice. Choir members from St. Kizito Parish and a group from the University of Juba who had been working jointly in the creation of the anthem were also present during the practice.

Speaking to the crowd shortly before the practice began, Cde. Bol Makueng, SPLM Secretary for Information, Culture and Communication at the Southern Sector, said the time has come for the people of South Sudan to build in them the sense of nationalism.

“As citizens of the new Republic of South Sudan, we shall have duties and responsibilities. One of them is learning our anthem, believing in it and doing what the nation requires of us,” he said.

“Our national anthem, our constitution and our national flag together form the face of unity of South Sudan.”


Cde. Bol Makueng

He went on to thank Chairman Kiir for standing firm and bringing the people of South Sudan to this stage despite continues ploys by the NCP to derail the process.

Cde. Maj. William Deng Ajak from the SPLA also thanked the SPLM for taking the initiative to start teaching the national song. He said the SPLA band might be brought in to join the practice next time.

On March 22, the Council of Ministers of the Government of South Sudan partially approved the wording and tune of the anthem. The final and official is expected to come out soon but organizers are confident that if any changes are made, they will be minimal.

According to Cde. Korsuk Nyarsuk, the organizer of the practice and SPLM National Director for Syndicated Organizations, the final official tune and wording will not vary much from the present.

“People have to start learning the tune and lyrics now, if there is any change, it will surely be in the text and it will be so minimal that it will not affect what we are doing now,” he said.

This is not the first practice. Early, the organized also liaised with the churches in Juba who called on their congregation to turn up for practice at their premises. The organizers wish to extend the service to schools and other institutions.

“We want as many South Sudanese as possible to know the anthem by the time it is sang for the first time in an independent South Sudan,” said Cde. Korsuk Nyarsuk.

To find out more about future practices, please feel free to contact This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

###

 

SPLM Feeds